Community School Parks FAQ

How can we “green” our school and open it to the community?

A:

Start by organizing like-minded neighbors, then visit Community-School Parks, and begin discussions with teachers and administrators through your school site council. Flower and vegetable gardens, planters, trees, playground equipment and grass ball fields are all components of a Community-School Park and can be introduced bit by bit. Hopefully, the school can be opened to neighborhood residents during non-school hours, weekends and school holidays. See the District’s ombudsman page, for information about how to create a small garden or plant trees on your campus.

Are after-school recreation and academic enrichment programs part of Community-School Parks?

A:

People for Parks has raised private funds to provide quality recreation and academic enrichment programs at Vine Street and Trinity Street elementary schools. Working with agencies and community organizations with a track record of providing recreation and academic programs. saves another major expense. People for Parks also hopes to include local high school students to participate in appropriate academic enrichment programs at the Community-School Parks. We will continue to raise private funds to make high quality enrichment programs a reality.

Do the City of Los Angeles and L.A. Unified School District officially support Community-School Parks?

A:

Yes! The L.A. City Council and School District unanimously approved motions in 2008 and 2009 to create a Community-School Parks Working Group with People for Parks. The District chose four elementary schools and will contribute $500,000 per school to build green turf multi-purpose fields, with running tracks around them, trees, and other park amenities. People for Parks is working to ensure that supervision and recreation programs are in place at Vine Street and Trinity Street elementary schools through grants and foundation support. Construction is scheduled to begin in March 2011 and they should open during the summer of 2011. PFP will work with the City and the LAUSD to open new Community-School Parks as funds become available.

Are Community-School Parks safe?

A:

People for Parks believes that a combination of religious and nonprofit organizations, recreation and education professionals, and law enforcement is the best assurance of a safe Community-School Park. People for Parks is working with the L.A. Unified School District to identify the best group to manage and supervise each Community-School Park during non-school hours. No Community-School Park will be open to the public without the District’s approval of a nonprofit or public agency that can provide that service. People for Parks is also creating a Green Team program to train young adults who live in the neighborhoods around Vine Street and Trinity Street schools on how to maintain the newly created parks and supervise recreation programs.